Back to Contents

3. Maps showing respondent locations overlaid on analogue TV coverage

bbc

+

locations of local relay transmitters

i

composite analogue coverage

e

DTT use where analogue reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

y

satellite use where analogue reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

Fig. 1 - Map of satellite and Freeview use

Fig.1 shows predicted analogue TV coverage in Dorset.  Overlaid on this map are the locations of respondents to the SWEDBAG survey who have reported poor reception of analogue TV and who are making additional use of Digital Satellite or Freeview (Digital Terrestrial Television – DTT).  Analogue TV coverage is predicted to be good in most of the major population centres. The map shows that there are a significant number of analogue relay stations built to fill deficiencies in coverage from the main stations.  In areas of poorer analogue coverage, Digital satellite is a common alternative way of receiving TV.

In many of the white areas where coverage is predicted to be poor, the signal strength may be sufficiently strong to receive TV pictures, but these areas may be vulnerable to interference from continental TV stations during abnormal propagation conditions. 

Note that throughout this report, we use the terms coverage and reception.  Coverage is acceptable where the computer-predicted or measured signal quality at the household roof aerial location is acceptable.  Reception takes account of the additional degradation that can be introduced by a poor receiving aerial, down lead or installation etc.  Also the coverage maps in this report have been produced using the latest high resolution prediction tools,

taking full account of continental interference, so they may not match fully the older coverage information available from the BBC’s website.  Nevertheless they are good indications of the coverage available in the area.

In the following maps showing areas in Dorset in more detail, where viewers are in the coverage areas of local relays (areas shown in blue), it would be worthwhile checking whether the viewer is actually using the local relay or perhaps for historical reasons is watching the main station.  One simple way of checking this is to look at the receiving aerial (usually on the roof/chimney).  If the elements on the aerial (the metal “fingers”) point up and down, it is likely that the local relay is being watched, but if the elements point from side-to-side (horizontally), then the main station is probably being watched.  If the viewer is in the coverage area of a local relay and the main station is being watched, the recommendation for those with problems is to get an approved aerial installer to install a new receiving aerial to watch analogue signals from the local relay as this should improve picture quality significantly. 

For more detailed help on receiving the BBC’s services, please see Section 6 or http://www.bbc.co.uk/reception

bb

+

locations of local relay transmitters

5

coverage of surrounding stations

*

location of those who responded to the survey

6

coverage of the Bridport relay transmitter

7

location where BBC One reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

 

 

Fig. 2 - Predicted Analogue TV coverage in Bridport

Where viewers reporting poor reception are in the coverage area of the Bridport local relay (the blue shaded areas on the map), they should check their aerial to see if they are actually using the Bridport relay or are watching the main station.  If the main station is being watched, the recommendation is for the viewer to get an approved aerial installer to install a new receiving aerial to watch analogue signals from the Bridport local relay as this should improve picture quality significantly.  Note that this advice is not appropriate for Freeview reception as the Bridport relay does not carry the Freeview services (although it will do so at the time of switchover).

Where analogue reception is poor, the correct station is being watched and the viewer’s property is in an area predicted to be covered (whether from a main station or relay), (the yellow or blue shaded areas on the map), poor reception is then probably a sign of a receiving aerial installation that needs upgrading.  In most cases, getting an approved aerial installer to fit a high quality digital-ready receiving aerial and a new aerial down-lead using components that have received the “digital tick” certificate should improve picture quality significantly.  This is particularly true of older installations that may have deteriorated because of damage through bad weather, corrosion or ingress of water.  Where analogue reception is poor and coverage is predicted to be poor (the white areas on the map), viewers should use very high quality receiving installations or consider satellite reception.

lr

+

locations of local relay transmitters

8

 composite coverage of stations

 *

location of those who responded to the survey

9

location where BBC One reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

Fig. 3 - Predicted Analogue TV coverage in Lyme Regis

There is no specific relay to serve Lyme Regis as main station coverage is acceptable although there are a number of nearby relays e.g. at Charmouth. 

Where analogue reception is poor, the correct station is being watched and the viewer’s property is in an area predicted to be covered (whether from a main station or relay), poor reception is then probably a sign of a receiving aerial installation that needs upgrading.  In most cases, getting an approved aerial installer to fit a high quality digital-ready receiving aerial and a new aerial down-lead using components that have received the “digital tick” certificate should improve picture quality significantly.  This is particularly true of older installations that may have deteriorated because of damage through bad weather, corrosion or ingress of water.

Where analogue reception is poor and coverage is predicted to be poor (the white areas on the map), viewers should use very high quality receiving installations or consider satellite reception.

bea

+

locations of local relay transmitters

12

coverage of the Beaminster relay transmitter

*

location of those who responded to the survey

13

coverage of surrounding stations

14

location where BBC One reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

 

 

Fig. 4 - Predicted Analogue TV coverage in Beaminster

Where viewers reporting poor reception are in the coverage area of the Beaminster relay, the viewer should check if they are actually using the Beaminster relay or are watching the main station.  If the viewer is in the coverage area of the Beaminster relay and the main station is being watched, the recommendation is for the viewer to get an approved aerial installer to install a new receiving aerial to watch analogue signals from the local relay as this should improve picture quality significantly.  Note that this advice is not appropriate for Freeview reception as the Beaminster relay does not carry the Freeview services (although it will do so at the time of switchover).

Where analogue reception is poor, the correct station is being watched and the viewer’s property is in an area predicted to be covered (whether from a main station or relay), poor reception is then probably a sign of a receiving aerial installation that needs upgrading.  In most cases, getting an approved aerial installer to fit a high quality digital-ready receiving aerial and a new aerial down-lead using components that have received the “digital tick” certificate should improve picture quality significantly.  This is particularly true of older installations that may have deteriorated because of damage through bad weather, corrosion or ingress of water.  Where analogue reception is poor and coverage is predicted to be poor (the white areas on the map), viewers should use very high quality receiving installations or consider satellite reception.

mn

+

locations of local relay transmitters

15

coverage of the Chilfrome relay transmitter

*

location of those who responded to the survey

16

coverage of surrounding stations

17

location where BBC One reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

 

 

Fig. 5 - Predicted Analogue TV coverage in Chilfrome

Where viewers reporting poor reception are in the coverage area of the Chilfrome relay, the viewer should check if they are actually using the Chilfrome relay or are watching the main station.  If the viewer is in the coverage area of the Chilfrome relay and the main station is being watched, the recommendation is for the viewer to get an approved aerial installer to install a new receiving aerial to watch analogue signals from the local relay as this should improve picture quality significantly.  Note that this advice is not appropriate for Freeview reception as the Chilfrome relay does not carry the Freeview services (although it will do so at the time of switchover).

Where analogue reception is poor, the correct station is being watched and the viewer’s property is in an area predicted to be covered (whether from a main station or relay), poor reception is then probably a sign of a receiving aerial installation that needs upgrading.  In most cases, getting an approved aerial installer to fit a high quality digital-ready receiving aerial and a new aerial down-lead using components that have received the “digital tick” certificate should improve picture quality significantly.  This is particularly true of older installations that may have deteriorated because of damage through bad weather, corrosion or ingress of water.  Where analogue reception is poor and coverage is predicted to be poor (the white areas on the map), viewers should use very high quality receiving installations or consider satellite reception.

dor

+

locations of local relay transmitters

21

composite coverage of stations

*

location of those who responded to the survey

22

location where BBC One reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

Fig. 6 - Predicted Analogue TV coverage in Dorchester

There is no specific relay to serve Dorchester although there are a number of nearby relays.

Where analogue reception is poor, the correct station is being watched and the viewer’s property is in an area predicted to be covered (whether from a main station or relay), poor reception is then probably a sign of a receiving aerial installation that needs upgrading.  In most cases, getting an approved aerial installer to fit a high quality digital-ready receiving aerial and a new aerial down-lead using components that have received the “digital tick” certificate should improve picture quality significantly.  This is particularly true of older installations that may have deteriorated because of damage through bad weather, corrosion or ingress of water.

Where analogue reception is poor and coverage is predicted to be poor (the white areas on the map), viewers should use very high quality receiving installations or consider satellite reception.

Analogue coverage in Dorchester is predicted to be poor because of incoming interference from French stations which will only happen during times of anomalous propagation conditions (usually warm summer evenings).  Nevertheless the signal levels from the Rowridge transmitter are good and the DTT coverage from Rowridge will significantly increase beyond that of the analogue service at the time of switchover.

wey

+

locations of local relay transmitters

31

coverage of surrounding main stations

*

location of those who responded to the survey

32

coverage of the Weymouth relay transmitter

3334

location where BBC One reception is reported as poor from the questionnaire

35

coverage of the Bincombe Hill relay transmitter

 

 

36

coverage of the Preston relay transmitter

Fig. 7 - Predicted Analogue TV coverage in Weymouth

Where viewers reporting poor reception are in the coverage area of the Weymouth, Bincombe Hill or Preston relays, the viewer should check if they are actually using the local relay or are watching the main station.  If the viewer is in the coverage area of the local relay and the main station is being watched, the recommendation is for the viewer to get an approved aerial installer to install a new receiving aerial to watch analogue signals from the local relay as this should improve picture quality significantly.  Note that this advice is not appropriate for Freeview reception as these relay stations don’t carry the Freeview services (although they will do so at the time of switchover).

Where analogue reception is poor, the correct relay station is being watched and the viewer’s property is in an area predicted to be covered (whether from a main station or relay), poor reception is then probably a sign of a receiving aerial installation that needs upgrading.  In most cases, getting an approved aerial installer to fit a high quality digital-ready receiving aerial and a new aerial down-lead using components that have received the “digital tick” certificate should improve picture quality significantly.  This is particularly true of older installations that may have deteriorated because of damage through bad weather, corrosion or ingress of water.  Where analogue reception is poor and coverage is predicted to be poor (the white areas on the map), viewers should use very high quality receiving installations or consider satellite reception.

sherborne

jk

composite coverage of stations

 

 

Fig. 8 - Predicted Analogue TV coverage in Sherborne

Where analogue reception is poor, the correct station is being watched and the viewer’s property is in an area predicted to be covered (whether from a main station or relay), poor reception is then probably a sign of a receiving aerial installation that needs upgrading.  In most cases, getting an approved aerial installer to fit a high quality digital-ready receiving aerial and a new aerial down-lead using components that have received the “digital tick” certificate should improve picture quality significantly.  This is particularly true of older installations that may have deteriorated because of damage through bad weather, corrosion or ingress of water.

Where analogue reception is poor and coverage is predicted to be poor (the white areas on the map), viewers should use very high quality receiving installations or consider satellite reception.

radio5

Fig. 9 - Predicted Coverage of the BBC’s Radio 5 Medium Wave Service

Fig. 9 shows the predicted medium wave coverage for Radio 5 in Dorset.  For each area of the three stations providing coverage in this area (Start Point, Clevedon and Fern Barrow), there is a difference between the daytime coverage (shown as ‘ground wave’) and the night time coverage (shown as ‘mixed wave’).  The different coloured areas that look a bit like a spider’s web show the different post code areas and can be ignored. 

There are areas where the map indicates coverage is incomplete e.g. in Dorchester, Weymouth and Portland.  However, because of the way medium wave services fail gradually, it should still be possible to receive Radio 5 in these areas although the quality will be lower and more vulnerable to interference from other stations.

aerial

Fig. 10 - Predicted Coverage of the BBC’s National FM Network

Fig 10 shows the predicted coverage of the BBC’s national FM radio network in Dorset.  Coverage in Dorset is generally good in all areas except where the hilly terrain obstructs reception.  Note that this map reflects coverage for a full service to an FM radio with stereo reception.  FM radios will provide mono reception to much lower signal levels and the coverage for this situation would be significantly higher than shown.

As mentioned in Section 4, the BBC has no plans to roll out its national FM network further in Dorset.  The map shows a number of areas where coverage is incomplete e.g. around Lyme Regis because of local terrain obstructions and interference.  Nevertheless mono reception should be possible in many of these areas.  If reception is found to be poor, in many cases it will be significantly improved by the installation of a good quality roof aerial intended specifically for FM radio reception.

fm coverage

Fig. 11 - Predicted Coverage of the BBC’s Local FM Network

Fig 11 shows the current prediction composite coverage of the BBC’s local FM radio network.  Note that the actual areas shown may not match the correct editorial boundaries as certain assumptions have needed to be made in the algorithm that selects which service is shown to have precedence.  The map shows reasonable levels of coverage in all areas of the country apart from the far west of Dorset.

The BBC has declared in ‘Building Public Value’ [2] its desire to launch a new local FM service specifically intended to serve Dorset which should improve overall coverage to the county and will provide content specifically targeted for the people of Dorset.  We are awaiting the licence fee settlement and will need to undertake a ‘public value assessment’ prior to the launch of this service.

dab

Fig. 12 - Predicted Coverage of the BBC’s National DAB Multiplex

 Fig 12 shows the predicted coverage of the BBC’s national DAB multiplex in Dorset.  Many major roads and major population centres are served but further transmitters will be required to complete coverage.  The BBC has developed outline plans to enable its national DAB coverage to increase from the current 85% to 90% of the population as detailed in Building Public Value, with a significant increase in the number of transmitters.  However, this increase cannot be confirmed until the level of the licence fee settlement is known (expected soon).

bournemouth dab

Fig. 13 - Predicted coverage of the Bournemouth local DAB multiplex

Fig 13 shows the predicted coverage of the Bournemouth local DAB multiplex which carries BBC Radio Solent (map provided courtesy of Arqiva). The service has been planned to cover within the Primary Protected Area (PPA) shown by the blue boundary as determined by the Ofcom licence for this local commercial multiplex.  In order to extend its coverage to the west of this area, the BBC will need to take up reserved capacity on the proposed West Dorset local multiplex when this is licensed by Ofcom.

 

Back to Contents